January, 2009  // Posts published in January, 2009

14 Jan 2009 Posted in Physiology

Mind vs Matter

featured_talent_vs_training

Yesterday’s , and the role of mental aspects to performance, left off with the short recap of a fatigue series that I wrote almost a year ago. It reminded us that the brain is ultimately in control of exercise, and that fatigue, or the decision to slow down during exercise is not taken because the […]

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13 Jan 2009 Posted in Physiology

Mind over matter?

featured_talent_vs_training

Interesting times and debates over the last week, where we discussed the issue of nature vs. nurture. It stimulated a good response, and some divided opinion, though most will probably agree that truly great performances are the result of a combination of genetic potential meeting hard work. Few would suggest that great sporting performances are […]

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07 Jan 2009 Posted in Talent vs training

Nature vs nurture

featured_talent_vs_training

Of the many debatable issues in sport (or in life, for that matter), few are as “unanswerable” as the issue of nature vs. nurture, the notion that people are born champions or made into champions through hours (and years) of hard work. This debate applies to just about anything – your salary, your ability to play […]

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06 Jan 2009 Posted in Talent vs training

The Matthew Effect Part 2

Photo by Flickr user Stefan Schmitz

Yesterday, I did a , as applied to sports performance and talent Identification. Briefly, it refers to the phenomenon where a disproportionate number of elite level sports people are born during the first few months of the year. This comes about as a result of a confusion between ability and maturity, and the selection of […]

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05 Jan 2009 Posted in Talent vs training

The Matthew Effect

Photo by Wikipedia user Tysto (Derek Jensen)

The first post of 2009 is inspired by a book I read over the break – Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell. One of the very first things I recall learning when I started out my postgraduate studies was a tip from Prof Tim Noakes to read widely, and read outside your field. Sensible advice, and it informs much of what […]

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