2013 Tour de France  // Posts categorised as 2013 Tour de France

2013 Recap. And Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, all!

As 2013 draws to a close, let's look back on the highs and lows of 2013 here on the Science of Sport, with a look ahead to what 2014 might bring!

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17 Jul 2013 Posted in 2013 Tour de France

Tour de France 2013: Alp d’Huez preview

Cycling's most famous climb is featured twice in one stage in 2013. We look back at its history to look forward to what to expect this year.

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14 Jul 2013 Posted in 2013 Tour de France

Mont Ventoux Preview: Looking forward by looking back

A look ahead to the climb of Mont Ventoux in the 2013 TDF, and what the history leads us to expect

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09 Jul 2013 Posted in 2013 Tour de France/Doping in Cycling

Healthy skepticism, dealing with doping and denial

Skepticism is an essential part of cycling's quest to regain the trust of its followers. Here's why

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Tour 2013 rest day: Pondering the unanswerables with physiological implications

Chris Froome's near-record ascent of Ax-3-Domaines asks some challenging physiological questions. Proof is impossible, but the implications warrant consideration.

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Froome’s first mountain performance: Cue debate

Chris Froome assumed the yellow jersey and control of the Tour on Ax-3-Domaines with a near-record ascent. Brief first thoughts on the performance and debate it is likely to inspire

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Clean performances to surpass doped performances?

A brief look at the the effect of doping on performance, with a view to predicting when, if ever, a clean performance will surpass a doped one

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Ax-3-Domaines: History, VAMs and performance predictions

The 2013 Tour tackles its first mountain finish. We look back on Ax-3-Domaines and predict what you can expect from the 2013 race.

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Froome’s non-published TDF power output: Noise for ‘pseudoscientists’?

Team Sky have refused to publish their cyclist's power outputs for fear of misinterpretation by "pseudoscientists". Does he have a point, or is transparency better in all circumstances?

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