Sports management  // Posts categorised as Sports management

03 Aug 2017 Posted in Physiology/Rugby/Sports management

Head injuries in Rugby Part 3: The key evidence and law change advice

This is part 3 of the 3-part series on head injuries in rugby. It explores the two most interesting and relevant findings of the research, looking at how the height of the tackle and the body position of the players influences head injury risk. These two items formed the strongest evidence that was used to change the high tackle laws in the sport. We also discuss the next steps and future application of the research.

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Head injuries part 2: What makes a tackle risky?

This is the second installment in a series of articles translating recent research I published on the risk of head injuries during rugby. This part looks at the characteristics of the tackle that increase or decrease the risk.

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Head injuries in Rugby, Part 1: Principle & high-level view

World Rugby recently changed and clarified laws around the high tackle in an attempt to reduce the number of concussions in the sport. That change was based on an in-depth study of the tackle, done to identify the mechanisms for head injury. This post, the first of a series of three articles on the subject, discusses the process, the principle of the research, and the high level findings.

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An Open Letter to Athletics South Africa: Address the non-selection controversies for the sake of athletes

Athletics South Africa, the governing federation for Track and Field in South Africa, recently announced the SA squad for the upcoming World Athletics championships in London. An ambiguous mix of selection criteria and omissions has created controversy. I write an open letter to ASA calling for clarity, and a reversal of certain non-selections for the squad.

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Testosterone, performance & intersex athletes: Will the IAAF evidence be enough?

In 2015, the Court of Arbitration set aside an IAAF policy that required female athletes to have a Testosterone level below a cut-off threshold. Now, 2 years later, with the IAAF appeal imminent, new evidence has emerged, with possible implications for athletes like Caster Semenya. But will the IAAF's new evidence be enough. Here's a look at some issues.

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Concussion in cycling: A challenge for culture & policy change

Dramatic footage in the aftermath of a Tom Skujns crash in the Tour of California triggered some discussion around cycling's concussion protocols. Some thoughts on the tricky, if not impossible proposition of introducing a "recognize and remove" policy to cycling

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The pursuit of the sub-2 marathon: Where to next?

Where do we go next? Now that Eliud Kipchoge has taken us to the brink of a sub-2 hour marathon, have the boundaries of human endurance been recalibrated? Can we expect a 1:59 soon? Or did the Nike staged event simply move some of the boundaries aside? This piece looks at potential benefits, and asks whether we should expect to see a speeding up, or a slowing down, in the foreseeable future?

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Eliud Kipchoge 2:00:25

Eliud Kipchoge has run a marathon in 2:00:25, coming within sight of breaking the 2-hour barrier. How did he do it, and what might we expect in future? This post analyzes the splits, the tactics and the prospects for the 1:59:59 in the future.

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On the recalibration of world records: Brief thoughts

A proposal to recalibrate the track and field world records by removing all records set prior to 2005 has caused considerable controversy. I offer some views on the proposal, and explain why the step is probably necessary, but should not be 'abused' as a sign of a new generation.

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